What does it mean to be a language variationist and bilingual?

Authors

  • Jeehye Park Georgia State University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.52242/gatesol.41

Keywords:

anguage variationist, bilingual, power, identity, standardized English

Abstract

This article discusses what it means to be a bilingual and language variationist while revisiting the author’s language learning experiences. It shows how the author gains power and multilayered identities to employ a variety of Englishes as a tool for academic success and to be a part of community.

 

Author Biography

Jeehye Park, Georgia State University

Jeehye Park is a first-year student at the school of Middle and Secondary Education and the Graduate Program in Language and Literacy Education at the Georgia State University. She holds a Master’s degree in ESL (English as a Second Language) Education from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

 

 

 

References

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Published

10/31/2016

How to Cite

Park, J. (2016). What does it mean to be a language variationist and bilingual?. GATESOL Journal, 26(1). https://doi.org/10.52242/gatesol.41

Issue

Section

Personal Stories & Perspectives – Have Your Say